2013 – that was the year that was

So how was 2013 for you? As the year comes to an end, and a new one begins, here’s a quick academic and automotive review.

For me, 2013 began where 2012 left off as my data collection for my PhD continued with a couple of focus group sessions and further interviews. As such, much of the year has been spent transcribing and analysing interviews and other data, which can be an onerous task although the rewards upon analysing the gems therein more than make up for it! In addition, there have been little extra-curricular academic successes on the way.

I wrote a post about two postgraduate conferences I attended and presented at, namely the Royal Geographical Society Postgraduate Forum Mid-term conference at Birmingham University in late March and the Tyndall Centre Climate Transitions PhD Conference held at Cardiff University in early April. Cracking conferences both, the latter hosted a blogging competition pertaining to delegates’ interests, with the winner afforded the chance of their entry being published in The Guardian. I was pleasantly surprised that my blog post won and, although the Guardian didn’t run with it, you can read it on the Tyndall Centre website.

The Tyndall Centre PhD Conference was swiftly followed by Coventry University’s Business, Environment and Society (BES) faculty poster symposium, in which my entry secured not only 3rd place but also garnered the ‘student vote’ too, both resulting in prizes of Waterstones vouchers. By coming 3rd, my poster went forward to the main university poster competition in July, whereupon it was awarded a joint-3rd place as part of a clean sweep for the BES faculty.

Another academic event I attended in 2013 was a reading and writing weekend held at Gregynog Hall in mid-Wales under the auspices of the Royal Geographical Society’s Social and Cultural Geography Research Group and, like the earlier conferences, was a thoroughly enjoyable and uplifting event where it was great to meet other postgrads and academics, and to chew the academic fat.

Look carefully - that's me blatting the Toyota GT86 around the Milbrook Alpine course (Picture Source: Newspress).

Look carefully – that’s me blatting the Toyota GT86 around the Milbrook Alpine course (Picture Source: Newspress).

Automotive-wise, an obvious highlight was being invited to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) test day at the Milbrook Proving Ground in early May (thank you again, MajorGav!). I spent a great day meeting up with automotive twitterati and driving cars I wouldn’t normally get the chance to, such as the Porsche 911 and Toyota GT86, and I also drove the electric Renault Zoe for the first time; being taken on a brief ride around the Bedfordshire countryside in a vintage Vauxhall 30/98 on a hot sunny day was fun too.

I attended the launch of the Greater Manchester Electric Vehicle (GMEV) scheme in July, prompting another spin in a Renault Zoe and a closer look at, but not a drive in (boo), the impressive-looking Tesla Model S. It’d be intriguing to find out how the 250 chargers throughout Greater Manchester are used, particularly the ones in Rochdale.

November brought the Classic Motor Show at the NEC which was strikingly busier than last year’s event. Though at times photographically frustrating, this increased interest can only be a good thing as people engage with the social, cultural and industrial artefact that is the car, and maybe even contemplate how the car is, and has been, consumed.

The final automotive event I attended was the December AutoTweetUp at the Heritage Motor Centre at Gaydon. I haven’t been to Gaydon for almost 20 years, so it was nice to look around the museum exhibits again and, as at the SMMT test day, it was a great opportunity to meet automotive twitterati old and new. Strangely, I haven’t blogged about it; perhaps I should.

Apart from my Tyndall PhD Conference blog entry, I’ve had one or two other things published online. An article I wrote about low carbon vehicles was published on The Green Car Website and, in a lighter vein, the PetrolBlog Real World Dream Barn I compiled late last year was complemented by the very first PetrolBlog Real World Dream Shed (well, it was my idea), and it’s great to see that one or two more Sheds being have put together since; more to come in 2014?

In addition, I was interviewed in October about my study by Coventry University MA Automotive Journalism alumni Max Prince for US car magazine Road & Track which attracted some comments, tweets and Facebook ‘likes’ and may (?) potentially lead to other writing opportunities.

So, looking back, it seems 2013 hasn’t been a bad year. I’ve driven a variety of cars (if only for one day), had some posts published and been interviewed for a car magazine. I’ve attended some great academic events and had some minor academic results. In both academic and automotive spheres, I’ve met and been reacquainted with some cracking folk – thank you all; it has been, and will continue to be, a pleasure.

Insofar as my thesis goes, I began the year continuing collecting data and end the year assessing and reassessing it all; there are still walls to scale, academic mountains to climb and chapters to rewrite, but things are perhaps slowly coming together. As to when I submit my thesis, I can’t exactly say, but hopefully late spring/early summer 2014.

To round off the year, as I write, views to this blog have just hit the 2000 mark since I started it in October last year. Thanks everyone for looking; I hope you’ve all enjoyed reading my posts and I’ll try to blog more often in the coming year (I think I said this last year too…!).

All the very best wishes for the coming year to you all, and here’s to 2014 – Happy New Year!