Classical gas: Volume 2

Last weekend, I visited an incredibly busy Classic Motor Show at the NEC. Here’s a brief roundup.

Such a lovely couple - Lamborghini Miura and Ferrari 208 (Picture source: author's photograph

Such a lovely couple – Lamborghini Miura and Ferrari 208 (Picture source: author’s photograph)

In the post I wrote on last year’s Classic Motor Show, I noted how busy the show had been compared to when I had previously attended in 2010. At the risk of repeating myself, this year’s show also seemed busier than last year; much, much busier. Having to queue to buy a ticket was no surprise (though this didn’t take long), but queuing to get into Hall 12 once I’d got my ticket was unexpected to say the least.

Eventually inside, I adopted the same plan as last year, which was to scoot around the stands taking as many photographs as possible before the NEC lights cast their distinctive hue upon everything, then peruse the autojumble for interesting models, books and brochures that I couldn’t afford (I almost succumbed to an Austin A90 Atlantic brochure), prior to making my way back through the show, all the while taking more time over things. It almost worked, but I still didn’t quite manage to get around it all.

It is remarkable to consider that while there is no British Motor Show any more, and hasn’t been since 2008, the Classic Motor Show seems to go from strength to strength. This year’s show was the 30th such event held at the NEC, and has grown from occupying just two halls in May 1984 to ten halls in November 2013. Taking photographs was difficult at times this year because of the sheer number of people there, and I began to wonder if the Classic Motor Show is beginning to get a bit big, a bit too successful.

I then stopped thinking like that, because it’s great that so many people want to look around cars that may well have played a part either in their past or in their dreams. The Classic Motor Show and its ever-increasing crowds would appear to prove how the automobile is more than mere transport; rather it is a culturally dynamic artefact, with each car on show invoking its own affect, for a whole host of reasons.

Taking a literal approach to the 17th century philosopher Benedict de Spinoza’s definition of affect, it is perhaps true to say that cars on show moved each of us present to a ‘greater perfection’ within ourselves, if for differing reasons. Such feelings of a greater perfection may be manifest in a comfortable nostalgia as we glimpse an example of our parents’ old car, or of the car we learned to drive in, or of our own first car, or perhaps in something more stirring as we espy a sports car we may regard as a piece of art (or something more primal…).

Events like the Classic Motor Show provide the chance for visitors to realise that all these cars, whether on show or in our past, make us feel a ‘something’, providing an illustration of how the car is ‘consumed’, something we perhaps seldom dwell upon as we drive our cars today. Such consumption constitutes a geography in itself and, as such, these events are worthy of academic consideration in themselves!

In no particular order, here are just some of the cars that invoked a ‘greater perfection’ the, er, greatest.

BMW Z1

BMW Z1Probably my favourite car at the show. While I’ve always liked the Z1, enough to include it in my PetrolBlog Real World Dream Barn, this was the first one I’d actually ever seen in the metal (or plastic, even). Suffice to say I like it even more now, and I really rather want one.

Mercedes Benz 190SL

Mercedes Benz 190SLThe Mercedes Benz Club stand was a delight, with several wonderful cars thereon serving to remind how Mercedes Benz was once a byword for style and elegance. The ‘Pagoda’ 250SL, 300SL Gullwing and 600 Grosser present on the stand were all were fabulous, but the one I really liked was this 190SL. Almost impossibly glamorous, and also probably my favourite car at the show.

Austin Maestro

Austin MaestroI may be showing my age here, but I recall how, in my youth, I dragged my dad down to the local BL dealer launch party when the Maestro first went on sale, so the fact that the Maestro – noted for its talking dashboard – celebrated its 30th birthday (blimey!) this year made me feel a little old.

Renault 16TX

Renault 16Very smart, with an almost tangible comfiness, this Renault 16 was another ‘car of the show’ contender for me. There are, unfortunately, far too few R16s left nowadays.

Bugatti Type 51 – ‘le Roadster Mysterieux

Bugatti T51Dubbing a car ‘the mystery coupe’ might prompt memories of Scooby Doo for some but, in this case, there appears to be a real puzzle about this particular Bugatti. It seems that while the factory production records show this car to be a Type 51, it seems that the identity of the coachbuilder who created the bodywork is less certain. A splendid car, whoever was responsible.

Jaguar C-X75

Jaguar C-X75It wasn’t just old cars which were on display at the NEC last weekend, as the hybrid Jaguar C-X75 supercar which made an appearance on the Jaguar Classic Parts stand shows. Having not made production, it perhaps wasn’t quite the halo car for low carbon automobility that it could have been but, from popular reaction, it certainly seemed to provide a halo for Jaguar here.

Morris Ital

Morris ItalThere was a large Morris presence at this year’s show, as the marque celebrated its centenary. The Morris Centenary stand had a wide range of cars from the marque’s history from a 1913 ‘Bullnose’ to this Morris Ital which, for some reason, I really liked.

Peugeot 304

Peugeot 304Very sweet and utterly French (or should that be tout à fait Française?), this 304 estate was an unassuming delight which raised a smile. Incidentally, behind it was another new car at the show, the Peugeot 308. I only managed a brief sit behind the wheel, but I was impressed; that early road tests suggest it is more suited to the Périphérique than the Nürburgring than have some cars been of late (even from French manufacturers – quelle horreur!) is also good news in my book.

Citroën DS

Citroen DSAnother voiture tout à fait Française – quintessentially so, even – surely no classic car show is complete without a Déesse (another car to reside in my PetrolBlog Dream Barn), and this was a splendid example. I had a really good chat with the folk on the Citroën Car Club stand not only about things Citroën, but also the environmental impact of the car and the merits of contemporary low carbon technologies versus the reuse and recycling that constitutes classic car motoring. We also talked about next year’s Coventry MotoFest being held from 30th May-1st June 2014 – click the link to find out more.

Audi Sport quattro

Audi Sport quattroI must admit that I was a bit of an Audi fanboy in the 80s; I had the Audi Sport t-shirt and rally jacket, Hannu Mikkola was my hero and so the Sport quattro became very much a favourite of mine back in the day (the ur-quattro is another inclusion into my PetrolBlog Dream Barn too). Chatting with the Club Audi member in attendance, it was pleasing to hear that both the ur-quattro and Sport quattro on the stand had attracted more attention than had the newer mid-engined R8 also present. Which is as it should be.

Triumph 1300

Triumph 1300For a Triumphista such as myself, this was an epic car in more ways than one. While some classic cars are stored away, this particular car was taken on a 13,000 mile post-restoration trek to the China. I think it’s fair to suggest that it’s probably run in by now.

A whistle-stop tour, then, of the 2013 Classic Motor Show. There were many other cars I could have included (maybe enough for a Classical gas: Volume 2 ‘B-side’?). A cracking day out all-in-all but please, NEC, sort out the lights – these classic cars deserve better than the jaundiced glow afforded at the moment. Perhaps the show could be moved to a time of year permitting longer ambient daylight (how does May sound…?). Even so, I’m sure I’ll be back next year.

Black and white and read all over

Last weekend, I joined 27 postgraduates and academics for the Royal Geographical Society Social and Cultural Geography Research Group’s ‘Reading and Writing Weekend’, held at Gregynog Hall, approximately 6 miles north of Newtown, in Powys.

Gregynog Hall - a place to read and a place to be read (Pictue source: author's photograph).

Gregynog Hall – a place to read and a place to be read (Pictue source: author’s photograph).

Having booked my place late, I would also arrive after most of the attendees on the Friday, due to my presenting at the Regional Studies Association Early Careers Conference in Manchester that afternoon. No matter; with Manchester Piccadilly station only two minutes walk away from the conference venue, I could easily pop onto a train down to Newtown (and grab some reading time too!) before then getting a taxi to Gregynog Hall itself. However, somewhere between Welshpool and Newtown, a huge bang followed by a massive shuddering of the carriage and the sound of cracking brought the train to a halt, seemingly in the middle of nowhere.

Blimey. What the hell was that!??!!?

It transpired that we’d hit some cattle on the line, ultimately stranding the train for over an hour and a half. While obviously a far from ideal situation (livestock and rolling stock aren’t a good mix), it must be said that the Arriva Trains Wales staff were tremendous, doing all they could to both keep us informed and get the train moving again. Having tweeted about the accident so as to let others already at Gregynog know that I’d be later than planned, I was also able to provide updates to our progress via twitter – despite an intermittent phone signal – to a stranger who was meant to collect someone on the train from a station further down the line and who’d picked up on my tweet. Alighting at Newtown just after 10pm, I tweeted a final update when the train departed and, with my good deed for the day done courtesy of the wonders of the twittersphere, I finally managed to reach Gregynog Hall where supper had been kept warm for me. And the bar was still open too!

I recommend the Blayney’s Ale, by the way.

A civilised reading space (Picture source: author's photograph).

All very civilised (Picture source: author’s photograph).

The reading on this weekend wasn’t just limited to academic texts. With acres of dark wood panelling, big leather sofas, stone-walled spiral staircases and a brilliant library, Gregynog Hall is a marvellously evocative building, invoking a real ‘affect’ that can be perhaps best described as somewhat ‘Agatha Christie’ – a cue for lots of references to candlesticks and lead piping over the weekend.

Having ascended said stone spiral staircases for the introductory seminar after breakfast, we were placed into four groups to discuss the sets of journal papers we’d all been assigned to read, before reconvening to discuss them more widely; fittingly, my group – led by Peter Adey from Royal Holloway University – was despatched to the library for the Saturday reading sessions pertaining to ‘Identity & Interaction’ and ‘Mobility & Migration’. These sessions were interspersed by lunch, afternoon tea (and cake!) and seminar sessions on academic writing and on the philosophy and rationale of the Social and Cultural Geography Research Group itself, entitled Why Social and Cultural Geography?

It was during this session that the clock on the wall of the seminar room sprang a surprise as we all noticed that the hands had begun to rapidly spin around the clock face of their own accord. Was this a corollary of a long day’s reading and thinking or, as had been earlier mentioned by some, Gregynog’s apparently haunted reputation? Either way, Saturday evening was a thoroughly civilised round of supper, academic natter, some drinks and a large Jenga.

Gregynog Hall library (Picture source: author's photograph).

Gregynog Hall library (Picture source: author’s photograph).

After a bleary (for some) Sunday breakfast, the rounds of reading discussions continued, this firstly on ‘Pedagogy & Place’ and then on ‘Sustainability & Food’, with another seminar on academic writing in between; however, the logistics of Sunday taxi availability coupled with one train every two hours meant that the latter reading session was missed by some (including myself) who left Gregynog just after lunch, musing on the weekend’s events and encounters as we went.

PhD research can be a lonely furrow to plough, and one of the reasons I (belatedly) decided to attend this reading and writing event at Gregynog was to somehow try and rediscover my academic ‘mojo’ after a recent creative lull. Events like postgraduate conferences and this weekend’s reading and writing session are always uplifting and reaffirming, and are a great way to meet with other postgraduates and learn about their research. Many thanks must go to Sarah Mills from Loughborough University and Rhys Dafydd Jones from Aberystwyth University for organising a great weekend, and also to everyone who attended for making a great weekend.

We must do this again sometime.

Gregynog Hall front elevation (Picture source: author's photograph).

Until next time…? (Picture source: author’s photograph).